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The Trump administration said Saturday that it was suspending a program that pays billions of dollars to insurers to stabilize health insurance markets under the Affordable Care Act, a freeze that could increase uncertainty in the markets and drive up premiums this fall.

CORRECTION: A previous version of this story said CareSource was receiving federal money from the risk pool and would have to pay $16 million. These alternative plans don't have to provide all of the Affordable Care Act's consumer protections.

Molina, on the other hand, won't have to send almost $1 billion, while Centene can avoid paying hundreds of millions of dollars to the program ... at least for now, JPMorgan projected.

That is a significant change as sometime this month that the bureau is expected to release a law that will allow customers to take these programs for a complete calendar year.

Over the a year ago, the White House has issued a number of executive orders and undertaken administrative actions to undercut the program popularly known as Obamacare. "Again, past year you heard a lot of that".

More than a dozen co-ops have failed since the ACA's implementation, and most have blamed the risk adjustment program.

Trump administration officials said they chose to suspend payments under the program because of a ruling in February from a Federal District Court in New Mexico.

Some co-ops have sued on grounds that the funding formula is unfair to small insurers.

Business groups and unions clash over Supreme Court nominee
Baldwin, like other Democrats who oppose Kavanaugh, cited concerns that abortion could be banned as a reason to not support him. In the case, Kavanaugh dissented on the court's ruling to allow an undocumented pregnant teenager to seek an abortion.


The administration, however, was not compelled to halt the payments on the basis of this ruling. In January a federal court in MA ruled the formula wasn't arbitrary and capricious.

In addition to encouraging private insurers to shun less healthy people, it will raise premiums. They are now deciding which exchanges they will participate in next year and what premiums they'll charge. But people who earn too much to qualify could be priced out of insurance. It's reasonable for the government to slash the program.

While the DOJ has argued that only the individual mandate, and not the entire ACA, should be struck down, its refusal to uphold the constitutionality of a current law is highly unusual. Since when did the claims of insurers become a reliable guide to American health care?

These "association health plans" are just one more facet of Trump's Obamacare sabotage, cheap plans with limited coverage meant to draw healthy people out of the Obamacare markets. Pregnancy could be one of these. The payments encouraged health insurers to enroll more consumers in plans and offered some financial help to cover the costs of individuals with higher medical care. The administration is also pushing to broaden the definition of short-term insurance, which is also exempted from the ACA's rules. Many have started making a profit and some are expanding their involvement for 2019, a marked change from this time past year, when several carriers said they were going to pull out of the exchanges for 2018.

This is one way the ACA, also known as Obamacare, makes it possible for people who need particularly expensive care to get health insurance at an affordable rate.

Kaiser Health News (KHN) is a national health policy news service. The group includes former Republican Senator Rick Santorum along with representatives from the Goldwater Institute, the Heritage Foundation and the American Enterprise Institute. That's because many ACA customers will qualify for federal government premium subsidies, which are still alive and well in Obamacare.

The Trump Administration said Tuesday it is slashing funding for groups that assist with Obamacare enrollment - marking the second consecutive year the Administration has cut such funding. Until now, the grants have been used only to help people choose and buy ACA health plans or to help steer people with low incomes toward Medicaid. The imposition of work requirements will not "dignify" program recipients and "lift them out of poverty", but will in many cases bump them off the benefit rolls through onerous requirements. The other half are covered by expanded Medicaid.

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