KXIP vs KKR Live Score

"This action today is not directly related to the allegations surfaced in press reports, which continue to be investigated independently", he continued. "Instead, they terminated my contract early because I sent a text message to one of our own CBS reporters demanding that she be fair in covering the story".

Rhodes said Fager violated company policy but did not specify the policy.

His firing came only three days after the CBS Corp. board ousted the company's chief executive, Leslie Moonves, who was charged with sexual misconduct in the same New Yorker articles. Rose had been a co-anchor since 2012 on "CBS This Morning" and a contributing correspondent on "60 Minutes".

Yesterday, Designing Women creator Linda Bloodworth Thomason published a scathing op-ed in The Hollywood Reporter accusing ex-CBS president Les Moonves of destroying her career. (FYI, CBS was home to both Murder, She Wrote and Cagney & Lacey.) Bloodworth Thomason said Moonves even removed the portraits of historic female television stars (Lucille Ball, Mary Tyler Moore, Candace Bergen, Bea Arthur) from the walls of the CBS studio, and she believes he deliberately changed the focus of the network to male-dominated shows like The Big Bang Theory and Two-and-a-Half Men.

On Sunday, Duncan reached out to Fager for his response to allegations in The New Yorker that he had groped or touched CBS employees at company parties. The latest allegation against Fager comes from Sarah Johansen, a former CBS intern, who told Farrow that the "60 Minutes" executive producer groped her at a work party.

Читайте также: Russian Federation prepares for largest military exercise since cold war

Fager said he would not have thought that one note would have resulted in a dismissal after 36 years at the network, "but it did".

But Fager has said that women have made significant advances at the broadcast, to the point where a majority its producers and associate producers are now women.

"60 Minutes" will enter its 51st season under the leadership of executive editor Bill Owens while the search for a new executive producer begins.

Farrow continued reporting. He heard from additional women who lodged serious accusations against Moonves. Bloodworth Thomason insists that while Moonves never sexually harassed or attacked her, he used his position of power to assault other CBS employees, including an actress on an "iconic detective show".

But when the LA Times followed up with a report that TV executive Phyllis Golden-Gottlieb had gone to cops a year ago, accusing Moonves of sexual and physical assault when they worked together in the 1980s - he admitted to the directors that he'd known about the police report but didn't tell the company because it was a "personal matter", the Times reports.

При любом использовании материалов сайта и дочерних проектов, гиперссылка на обязательна.
«» 2007 - 2018 Copyright.
Автоматизированное извлечение информации сайта запрещено.

Код для вставки в блог


COMMENTS