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There has been a storm of complaints this week following recent research claims that, despite Apple's supposedly firm privacy policies, multiple IOS and Mac App Store apps have been gathering user data and uploading it to their analytics servers.

Wardle said Adware Doctor was the fourth-highest grossing paid application on the App Store, and topped the category of paid utilities. Cleaner and Dr. Battery, which were all booted from Apple's official app store this past weekend over the data collection.

Other programs by Trend Micro, including Dr Cleaner, Open Any Files, and Dr Antivirus also exfiltrate user data without their consent, and have been removed from Apple's App Store.

The app market for just about every platform out there is rife with developers who use nefarious techniques to trick users into giving them access to their valuable personal data.

A number of apps found on Apple Inc.'s Mac App Store are alleged to be spying on users and stealing their data, according to a report from security firm Malwarebytes Inc.

Further analysis by security researcher Patrick Wardle showed that Adware Doctor sent the complete browser history from Safari, Chrome, and Firefox.

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It is unclear why Open Any Files was uploading data to Trend Micro servers, or if Trend Micro was the only company with access to the data uploaded by any of the Trend Micro apps. However, Apple seems to have failed to do its job properly here. Apple did finally remove Adware Doctor from the App Store once this story started to break, but as Wardle notes, he reported his findings to Apple a month ago and was promised a swift response. Over the weekend, the saga continued with revelations that several other apps in the Mac App Store were doing the same thing. However, while working on the browser, it silently collected data related to users' browsing.

By taking a "snapshot" of user browser history, the offending apps were able to analyse the possibility of adware and other threats that may be hiding on user phones.

The 9to5Mac report went on to claim that Dr. Unarchiver, Dr. As Trend Micro explains in its support section, if a site can't be verified by a local database or a memory-cache search, the service consults its server.

"We apologise to our community for concern they might have felt and can reassure all that their data is safe and at no point was compromised".

Apple hadn't responded to a request for comment. While they are not as harmful as malware used to steal credit card data, the problem is that unsafe apps are approved and allowed to distribute themselves on the App Store.


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