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The finding was recently detailed by Central Michigan University, where geology faculty member Mona Sirbescu was asked to take a look at the unusual 22lbs rock.

The man then chose to take his rock to Mona Sirbescu, a geology faculty member in earth and atmospheric sciences at Central Michigan University.

"For 18 years, the answer has been categorically "no"-meteor wrongs, not meteorites", Sibescu said in a statement from CMU on Thursday, CNN reports".

Weighing 22 pounds, it's also the sixth-largest recorded find in MI - and is believed to be worth $100,000, according to CMU. "It's the most valuable specimen I have ever held in my life, monetarily and scientifically".

The meteorite is the sixth-largest found in MI.

The rock arrived on Earth sometime in the 1930s, according its owner, who obtained it in 1988 when he bought a farm in Edmore, about 30 miles southwest of Mount Pleasant.

A U.S. farmer and his son saw a shooting star come crashing onto their property one night in the 1930s. Most iron meteorites are generally comprised of anywhere between 90 and 95 percent iron, with the rest made up nickel, iridium, gallium and occasionally gold.

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This January, southern MI experienced a meteor flash that showered fragments of space rock all over Livingston County. In the morning, the farmer and his father found the crater and dug out the still-warm meteorite.

Then, "I said, wait a minute".

The rock has sat patiently by the unnamed man's door for three decades, taking the occasional field trip to school with his children for show and tell. "I wonder what mine is worth", Mazurek said in the release.

The Smithsonian museum has valued the meteorite, which they named the Edford, at $100,000.

Mazurek has been retired since 2014, and he said the meteorite could turn into a cushion for his golden years.

The meteorite's anonymous owner is promising to donate 10% of sale proceeds to the university.

A sample has been sent to John Wasson, professor emeritus in the earth, planetary and space sciences department at the University of California, Los Angeles.


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