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Tom Cruise has stepped up the fight against motion smoothing.

Thankfully, there's a solution if your high-def TV has that feature, according to the screen idol and director.

The setting known as "motion smoothing" is created to make fast-moving images from sport and videogames look less blurry, by putting in artificial frames.

But the feature has "an unfortunate side effect when watching films" - it makes them look like they were shot on high-speed video rather than film, or "the soap opera effect, as Cruise calls it".

They wanted to inform audiences that when enjoying Mission: Impossible - Fallout, as well as other action films, home TVs are set in such a way that detracts from the filmmakers original intent.

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By default, motion smoothing is typically enabled on most HDTVs. In a video with Mission: Impossible - Fallout director Chris McQuarrie, Cruise taught viewers about "video interpolation", which many fans may know as the easier-to-spell term "motion smoothing".

Switching it off, he said, means struggling to navigate menus which are different for each brand of television, and even appear under different names such as "interpolation" or "motion compensation".

As McQuarrie puts it, "without a side-by-side comparison, many people can't quite put their finger on why the movie they're watching looks odd".

They said filmmakers were already working with manufacturers to change the way the feature was presented and activated on TVs, which they suggest would give users greater access and choice over when to use it.

"If you own a modern HD television, there's a good chance you're not watching movies the way the filmmakers intended", expained McQuarrie. 24fps is the standard in the film industry, and is key to achieving a "cinematic" look. It works alright on some content, like sports, but can totally ruin the effect of 24 fps content such as Hollywood movies.


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